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Transitioning your Modern Botanical

Plants into Water

Setting up your plants

Step 1: Soak in water for 2-5+ minutes

         Extra credit: break up the dirt pod a little bit.

Step 2: Pick the 2-3 best roots.. Remove all other roots

Step 3: Remove any left over dirt.

Step 4: Add plants to your vases filled with filtered water
Optional: Add nutrients


Wait 1 week.


Step 5.
Clip ends of roots.

Clean Roots if needed.
Optional: Add Nutrients

Refresh the water every 2-4 weeks.
Top off weekly or when needed.

What water should I use?

We recommend utilizing the best quality water you have access to. Reverse osmosis is ideal, however any filtered water should be sufficient. 

Dirt is stuck: How do I remove the dirt? 

Removing dirt can be tricky. We recommend soaking your roots and then rinsing them under a faucet. You can use a brush or your fingers to remove the dirt. Note: You can even cut all the roots short (1/2 inch is fine) New water roots will develop.

The plant doesn't fit well in the vase, what do I do  

Starter Plants take a few weeks to  start developing and growing and fill into their new space. After a few weeks, you should start to see some growth. Take a picture now so you can check back and see the difference :). Note: Quality water and a few drops of nutrients go a long way.If you are unsure if your plant is to standard feel free to message us on the chat to the right.

What lighting do I need? 

Our plants do best in medium to bright indirect light. Ideally at least 4 hours a day. Windows with natural light coming through are perfect. You can always supplement with high quality grow lights. We recommend GE or Soltec.

How do I mount the products on the wall

Are my plants faulty? 

If you have any questions about your plants, we are here to help :). Please send photos either to the chat (bottom right of your screen) or to hello@modernbotanical.shop

Where can I get the recommended nutrients?

Plant care

How often should I replace the water? 

Initially as your plants are getting acclimated, it's best to change the water every week.


After a month or two when they are used to their new home, replacing the water monthly so long as the water is topped off every 1 to 2 weeks in between replacements should be sufficient. Water is crucial not only for growth, but for providing oxygen to the plants to support growth. Your plant will deplete the available oxygen in the water over a few weeks and replacing or adding new water acts to re-oxygenate it. Plants will eventually die from a lack of oxygen if their water is not replaced.

You can encourage your water grown plants to grow more by replacing their water more often! 


Tip: Hydroponic nutrients goes along way. You can find our favorite nutrients by clicking here: Nutrient Drops. 

How much sunlight do my plants needs to survive?

Getting the right amount of light for a plant is essential to keep them healthy - too little and they are unable to photosynthesize, too much and their leaves will begin to yellow or brown. The majority of indoor plants and the varietals shipped and sold on our site like medium to bright indirect light. The best way to find indirect light is to find your brightest natural light room and find an opposing or side wall that is out of direct sunshine. Test your plants there and see how they do! Tip: if you have a wall that you'd like to adorn with plants that doesn't receive enough light, bulbs with grow light spectrums can easily be installed to supplement or even replace natural light, creating a happy environment for your plants to thrive. 

What should I do if my leaves are yellowing?

A yellowing leaf can mean one of a number of stress factors for a plant and the first thing to do would be identifying what that might be. Sometimes a leaf will simply yellow for no rhyme or reason and that's okay! We recommend assessing the plant health as a whole before over reacting to a single incident. One you've determined the plant health, figure out if you'd like to keep the leaf on or remove it. 

Do I eventually need to put my plants in soil?

Plants that grow in water can happily do so for the entirety of their life. So long as they're receiving adequate light, comfortable temperatures, fresh water, and regular nutrients, no soil is required! If you plant begins to outgrow your planter, new propagations can be cut and re-grown in water. 

Will my plants need nutrients to survive?  

For the first 4 months, from cutting to propagation, most plants will do fine without nutrients supplemented in the water. For any plants you intend to grow in water beyond those first few months, additional nutrients is necessary for a healthy plant! 

Is it okay to prune or cut back my plant while it's growing in water? 

Yes, absolutely. Most plants will generally need a handful of leaves remaining to stay healthy, but beyond that, trimming the plant for propagation or aesthetic purposes is just fine. 

What's the ideal temperature for keeping my plants happy? 

House plants are often house plants because they thrive in similar environments to humans - generally 60 degrees to 80 degrees fahrenheit. For plants that have yet to show roots, the warmer end of this range is great to encourage propagation. Colder temperatures can cause some varietals to experience root rot, characterized by a soggy browning of the roots. Warmer temperatures, especially when coupled with direct sunlight, can cause yellowing or browning of the plant leaves.  

My water is green: What to do about Algae?

House plants are often house plants because they thrive in similar environments to humans - generally 60 degrees to 80 degrees fahrenheit. For plants that have yet to show roots, the warmer end of this range is great to encourage propagation. Colder temperatures can cause some varietals to experience root rot, characterized by a soggy browning of the roots. Warmer temperatures, especially when coupled with direct sunlight, can cause yellowing or browning of the plant leaves.  

Root Rot: My roots are brown or mushy.

House plants are often house plants because they thrive in similar environments to humans - generally 60 degrees to 80 degrees fahrenheit. For plants that have yet to show roots, the warmer end of this range is great to encourage propagation. Colder temperatures can cause some varietals to experience root rot, characterized by a soggy browning of the roots. Warmer temperatures, especially when coupled with direct sunlight, can cause yellowing or browning of the plant leaves.  

 My plant is outgrowing it's vase - Getting so large the leaves are drooping.

House plants are often house plants because they thrive in similar environments to humans - generally 60 degrees to 80 degrees fahrenheit. For plants that have yet to show roots, the warmer end of this range is great to encourage propagation. Colder temperatures can cause some varietals to experience root rot, characterized by a soggy browning of the roots. Warmer temperatures, especially when coupled with direct sunlight, can cause yellowing or browning of the plant leaves.  


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